Posts Tagged "security"

Debian OpenSSL

Sorry readers, no *nix Tip of the Day today. Just a brief word about the recent Debian OpenSSL vulnerability.

I'm sure you've heard about Debian's OpenSSL "Disaster". The short of it is that while fixing a questionable line in the OpenSSL/OpenSSH key generator, the Debian maintainer accidentally removed most of its entropy generation ability. Debian users with OpenSSL and/or OpenSSH keys should go regenerate them now. I'll wait.

Anyhow, the other interesting thing I wanted to post about was this. It's some interesting math showing why you shouldn't be using DSA keys anyway.

Oh yeah, and I'm done …

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*nix Tip of the Day: SSH Agent Forwarding

Today's *nix tip of the day involves SSH and the magic that is Agent Forwarding.

SSH, as some of you know, is a handy way to connect to *nix systems in an untrusted environment. Its primary use is to allow one to remotely access a remote system and get a shell, securely. Basically, encrypted telnet. Of course, SSH has tons of other useful features (like tunneling, proxying, and multiplexing), some of which might come up in future Tips of the Day.

One of SSH's greatest features is its public/private key system. Basically, using private keys, you can allow much …

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*nix Tip of the Day: SSH Private/Public Keys

Hello kind readers, and welcome to by *nix Tip of the Day. It's finals week, and I'm sort of slacking, so I thought I'd post some of my accumulated folk wisdom on the Internet, so that it might help others.

Today's topic is SSH Private/Public Keys. If any of you are CS majors, or go to a tech-heavy school, or generally interact with Linux/OS X/Solaris/HP-UX/AIX/any other *nix, you've probably used SSH. SSH, at its most basic, is a replacement for telnet and rlogin; it allows you to get a shell at a remote machine …

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